UT Faculty/Researcher Works

Permanent URI for this collectionhttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/12

University of Texas at Austin faculty and researchers may submit their work to the UT Faculty/Researcher Works collection, by logging in to Texas ScholarWorks with their EID and password. Once you have logged in, please contact the Repository Curator at tsw@utlists.utexas.edu. The Repository Curator will set you up with submission privileges in this collection.

The UT Faculty/Researcher Works collection focuses on electronic research, scholarship, and creative works, as well as materials that primarily reflect the intellectual environment of the UT campus, created by faculty and researchers of the University of Texas at Austin.

Examples of possible content that can be submitted to this collection are:

  • Peer-reviewed articles where license allows (the Repository Curator can help you determine this)
  • White papers, working papers and technical reports
  • Manuscripts
  • Presentations
  • Digitized data
  • Audiovisual material
  • Any other form of research output that can be technically loaded to the repository.

If you would like more information about the submission process, including alternate submission workflows, please email the Repository Curator at tsw@utlists.utexas.edu

If you have questions about managing your data, please visit the Research Data Services website.

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Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 20 of 3886
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    Institutional Transfer Logics: Belief Systems and Understandings of Recommended Course Sequences Among Transfer Personnel at Public College and Universities
    (2024-06) Schudde, Lauren; Castillo, Sherri; Conroy, Kelsey; Giani, Matthew
    Using interviews with transfer personnel at five community colleges and seven public universities, we examine competing institutional logics—or belief systems—for how personnel approach vertical transfer and implement statewide reforms that call for transparency in programs’ recommended course sequences. Personnel using developmental logic viewed degree plans as customizable to individual needs, whereas those using functional logic viewed degree plans as a rigid sequence of courses. These two logics illustrate key tensions for vertical transfer, with important implications for competing recommendations for practice, even within the same institution.
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    Participatory Observation Methods Within Data-Intensive Science: Formal Evaluation and Sociotechnical Insight
    (Springer Nature, 2024-04-15) Hauser, Elliott; Sutherland, Will; Jarrahi, Mohammad Hossein
    This paper presents a framework enabling qualitative researchers to gain rich participatory access to study scientific practices within collaborative, funded research projects. Participatory observation methods provide unique access to scientific sites for social studies of science but require authentic and mutually beneficial motivations for qualitative researchers’ participation. We illustrate a successful approach to configuring such collaborations by presenting the case of our participatory observation of an intensive NSF-funded Data-Intensive Science (DIS) training, as members of the evaluation team. We detail how our dual-purpose data collection methods informed both funder-facing evaluation materials and our own subsequent research publications, completed in parallel to the training’s core objectives. We organize our site-specific findings on scientific practice around the themes of Technology, Practices, and Culture. Participatory evaluation of grant-funded science is a rich and under-utilized form of site access for sociotechnical researchers that can facilitate mutually beneficial scientific convergence.
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    The State of Digital Media Data Research, 2024
    (2024) Brown, Megan A.; Lukito, Josephine; Greenfield, Jason; Chen, Bin; Graham, Sarah; Shugars, Sarah; Pruden, Meredith L.
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    Massively Scalable Self-Assembly of Nano and Microparticle Monolayers via Aerosol Assisted Deposition
    (2023-11-20) Cossio, Gabriel; Barbosa, Raul; Korgel, Brian; Yu, Edward
    An extremely rapid process for self-assembling well-ordered, nano, and microparticle monolayers via a novel aerosolized method is presented. The novel technique can reach monolayer self-assembly rates as high as 268 cm2 min−1 from a single aerosolizing source and methods to reach faster monolayer self-assembly rates are outlined. A new physical mechanism describing the self-assembly process is presented and new insights enabling high-efficiency nanoparticle monolayer self-assembly are developed. In addition, well-ordered monolayer arrays from particles of various sizes, surface functionality, and materials are fabricated. This new technique enables a 93× increase in monolayer self-assembly rates compared to the current state of the art and has the potential to provide an extremely low-cost option for submicron nanomanufacturing.
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    Elucidating Piezoelectricity and Strain in Monolayer MoS2 at the Nanoscale Using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy
    (2024-02-05) De Palma, Alex; Peng, Xinyu; Arash, Saba; Gao, Frank; Baldini, Edoardo; Li, Xiaoqin; Yu, Edward
    Strain engineering modifies the optical and electronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides. Highly inhomogeneous strain distributions in twodimensional materials can be easily realized, enabling control of properties on the nanoscale; however, methods for probing strain on the nanoscale remain challenging. In this work, we characterize inhomogeneously strained monolayer MoS2 via Kelvin probe force microscopy and electrostatic gating, isolating the contributions of strain from other electrostatic effects and enabling the measurement of all components of the two-dimensional strain tensor on length scales less than 100 nm. The combination of these methods is used to calculate the spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential resulting from piezoelectricity, presenting a powerful way to characterize inhomogeneous strain and piezoelectricity that can be extended toward a variety of 2D materials.
  • Item
    Massively Scalable Self-Assembly of Nano and Microparticle Monolayers via Aerosol Assisted Deposition
    (2023-11-20) Cossio, Gabriel; Barbosa, Raul; Korgel, Brian; Yu, Edward
    An extremely rapid process for self-assembling well-ordered, nano, and microparticle monolayers via a novel aerosolized method is presented. The novel technique can reach monolayer self-assembly rates as high as 268 cm2 min−1 from a single aerosolizing source and methods to reach faster monolayer self-assembly rates are outlined. A new physical mechanism describing the self-assembly process is presented and new insights enabling high-efficiency nanoparticle monolayer self-assembly are developed. In addition, well-ordered monolayer arrays from particles of various sizes, surface functionality, and materials are fabricated. This new technique enables a 93× increase in monolayer self-assembly rates compared to the current state of the art and has the potential to provide an extremely low-cost option for submicron nanomanufacturing.
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    Wafer-Scale Si-Based Metal−Insulator−Semiconductor Photoanodes for Water Oxidation Fabricated Using Thin Film Reactions and Multiple-layer Electrodeposited Catalysts
    (2024-04-08) Lee, Soonil; Wu, Shang-Hsuan; Yu, Edward
    Solar-driven photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting offers a promising and environmentally friendly route for the conversion of renewable solar energy to hydrogen gas. A crystalline Si absorber is especially attractive due to its moderate bandgap, high charge mobility, long carrier diffusion length, costeffectiveness, and scalability in manufacturing. To improve the stability of Si-based PEC cells in operation, metal−insulator− semiconductor (MIS) structures have been widely employed. In this work, we employ simple and highly scalable processes to fabricate high-performance, extremely stable Si-based MIS photoanodes, and demonstrate their application to the fabrication of wafer-scale photoanodes. Localized conduction paths formed via an Al/SiO2 thin-film reaction enable low-resistance charge extraction even through thick insulating layers, yielding photoanodes with excellent stability. To improve the efficiency, we demonstrate a twostep Ni/NiFe electrodeposition process to create efficient oxygen evolution reaction catalysts. The Ni/NiFe catalyst allows for a high Schottky barrier between Si and Ni, lowering the photoanode onset potential, while the NiFe surface layer improves the catalytic performance. An unassisted solar-driven water splitting system incorporating a wafer-scale photoanode and monocrystalline Si solar cells is demonstrated and yields a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 6.9% under simulated AM 1.5G sunlight illumination.
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    Patient Opinions about Early Screening for Gestational Diabetes: A Qualitative Study
    (2024-05) Hopkins, Kristine; Jimenez, Karen; Harper , Lorie M.
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    Attacking ELECTRA-Small: Universal Adversarial Triggers for Reading Comprehension
    (2023-12-14) Gupta, Alok
    New question answering computer programs are pretty good at their job. They perform well when tested on certain datasets, like SQuAD (Rajpurkar et al., 2016) However, these datasets might not fully represent the challenges that come up in real-world situations where understanding what you're reading is important.Even the most advanced models can be affected by disruptions and adversarial text that is meant to decrease a model’s performance. In our paper, we gener- ate adversarial text examples to lower accuracy for the task of reading comprehension testing against the ELECTRA-Small model (Clark et al., 2020) trained on SQuAD. We suggest using a method called "beam search" to create what we call "universal triggers." We then test these triggers on different parts of the SQuAD dataset, with different vocabulary lists. The adversarial trig- gers produced by our beam search are able to effectively reduce a model’s accuracy on the SQuAD dataset by 33% for ’Why’ questions.
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    Moderating Social Media Discourse for a Healthy Democracy
    (2022-10-26) Lukito, Josephine; Kazanas, Kathryn; Chen, Bin; Murthy, Dhiraj; Kolluri, Akaash; Venkatesh, Pranav
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    FAIR Re-use: Implications for AI-Readiness
    (2024-04-16) Fletcher, Lydia
    A discussion of how to use the FAIR data principles to ensure quality data is being used in machine learning models. Presented at AI-Ready Data: Navigating the Dynamic Frontier of Metadata and Ontologies April 15-16, 2024
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    Digital Technology Self-Efficacy Survey Instrument
    (2024-04-17) Hughes, Joan E.
    This Digital Technology Self-Efficacy survey was constructed and adapted using 17-item computer self-efficacy scale from Holcomb et al., 2004, which was also adapted from Cassidy & Eachus’ (2002) self-efficacy instrument of 30-items. This scale aims to measure respondents’ confidence in technology in general. Cassidy, S., & Eachus, P. (2002). Developing the Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) scale: Investigating the relationship between computer self-efficacy, gender, and experience with computers. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 26(2), 133-153 Holcomb, L., King, F. B., & Brown, S. W. (2004). Student traits and attributes contributing to success in online courses: Evaluation of university online courses. The Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 2(3), 1-16.
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    "I Think You Should Explore the Kinky Market": How Entrepreneurs Develop Value Propositions as Emergent Objects of Activity Networks
    (Mind, Culture, and Activity, 2017-03) Spinuzzi, Clay
    Successful value propositions can be productively analyzed as emergent cocreated objects: co-created at the intersection of multiple activities with varying interests and cycles, and thus incrementally revised to address cross-activity tensions. These objects are also represented across multiple genres; entrepreneurs must keep these different representations coherent during the co-creation process. Drawing on a nine-month qualitative study of 50 firms enrolled in entrepreneurship training, I illustrate this process of co-creating value propositions and keeping them coherent. The author concludes by suggesting necessary theoretical extensions to improve how we study emergent cocreated objects.
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    CDR Data Management Plan: Data Survey and System Design
    (2020-10) Buschow, Paul; Howard, Teresa; Porter, Brent; Smith, Solar; Smithhart, Greg; Wells, Gordon
    The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research (UT-CSR) final report to address topics and questions raised by the General Land Office (GLO) concerning concepts underlying the Texas Disaster Information System (TDIS).
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    Film Music: Some Posts from Blogs
    (2024-03-18) Neumeyer, David
    This file (1) gathers posts on music theory, especially harmony and musical topics, from our blog Hearing the Movies, (2) likewise gathers some posts on film music from my blog Ascending Cadence Gesture in Tonal Music, and (3) adds a few notes and additional information.
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    They Always Get Our Story Wrong”: Addressing Social Justice Activists’ News Distrust Through Solidarity Reporting
    (Media and Communication, 2023-12) Varma, Anita; Limov, Brad; Cabas‐Mijares, Ayleen
    This study positions social justice activists’ objections to dominant reporting norms as a catalyst for critically reassessing these norms and their connection to diminishing trust in US journalism. Based on a conceptual application of discourse ethics to journalism and qualitative analysis of 28 in‐depth interviews with social justice activists, we examine how par‐ ticipants experience and evaluate mainstream coverage of social justice, and why they think journalism could improve its trustworthiness through practices consistent with solidarity reporting norms.