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Introduction

Texas ScholarWorks was established to provide open, online access to the products of the University's research and scholarship, to preserve these works for future generations, to promote new models of scholarly communication, and to help deepen community understanding of the value of higher education.

UT Tower and campus image credit: Earl McGehee, CC-BY, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/7452145850

 

Communities in TSW

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Recent Submissions

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Scholarly Communications Newsletter
(2024) Lyon, Colleen; Walter, Heather; Borrego, Gilbert
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Dyslexia Identification: Texas Legislative Trends in Prevalence Rate of Students by School District Locale
(Texas Education Review, 2024) Simmons, Michelle; Shin, Mikyung; Hart, Stephanie
State legislation serves as a guide and critical influence on the evaluation and identification of students with dyslexia across the United States. The state of Texas has numerous laws and regulations concerning dyslexia, guided by the Texas Administrative Code, Texas Education Code, Texas Occupations Code, and the Texas Education Agency’s dyslexia handbook (National Center on Improving Literacy [NCIL], 2021). This article is an analysis of publicly available statewide data to assess the impact federal and state legislative policies have had on the prevalence rate of students with dyslexia in 839 urban and rural school districts in Texas. 839 school districts from the 2016-2017 to 2022-2023 school years were extracted from the Texas Education Agency’s Public Education Information Management System. Researchers focused on the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Corrective Action to the TEA (OSEP, 2018), the TEA state dyslexia handbook revisions (TEA, 2021), and the unique prevalence of rural school districts in Texas (Simmons, Shin & Sharp, 2021). Analysis focused on implications for dyslexia evaluation and identification practices for school districts and evaluators within the state.
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Towards Congruency? A Descriptive Analysis of Employed Black Teachers in Texas from 2011-12 through 2017-18
(Texas Education Review, 2024) Johnson, Virginia Redwine; Williams, John A. III; Richardson, Micah
There was a period in U.S. history when Black teachers were heavily employed within the educational workforce and were leading examples of excellence (Anderson, 1988). Black teachers, teaching within their communities, were able to directly impact their students’ achievement and behavior while also reinforcing shared family values. As a result of the ramifications of implementing Brown v. Board of Education and strategies aimed at pushing Black teachers out, there has been a decrease in the presence of Black educators in the United States. This decline caused a ripple effect that is being felt throughout today’s classrooms nationwide. Still, this topic requires more recent investigations of the data to determine if Black teacher attrition is current or a phenomenon of the past. This study examined Texas’ teacher workforce data from the Texas Education Agency, highlighting the teacher demographics and identifying if there was an increase or decrease in Black teachers between 2011 and 2017. From the descriptive analysis, the researchers found that for most campuses based on urbanicity types, there was an increase in the average number of Black female and male teachers on campuses. Although racial congruency between the number of Black students and teachers appears to still be in the distant future, notably, campuses across Texas have implemented measures to draw Black teachers to their campuses.
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Breaking Barriers and Fostering Neurodiversity Awareness in Primary Education Through Inclusive Children’s Literature
(Texas Education Review, 2024) Amador, Sharon
Teachers are essential in ensuring children and society are aware of neurodiversity by actively incorporating inclusive children's literature into their classroom activities to promote understanding and acceptance of neurodiverse individuals. Existing research shows that integrating such literature enhances children’s perceptions. Many teachers encounter barriers to promoting neurodiversity awareness through this medium. This paper draws upon Vygotsky's sociocultural theory to analyze teachers' perceptions and beliefs concerning neurodiversity and their practices for using children's literature to promote neurodiversity awareness. This qualitative research study investigated the barriers teachers face in promoting neurodiversity awareness. Data collection involved semi-structured face-to-face interviews of eight K-2 grade teachers. A narrative analysis was used for interpretation. The findings indicate that school culture and climate, beliefs and attitudes, access to appropriate educational resources, curriculum constraints, and a lack of administrative support are significant barriers to effectively integrating neurodiversity awareness into classroom activities through inclusive children's literature.