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Introduction

Texas ScholarWorks was established to provide open, online access to the products of the University's research and scholarship, to preserve these works for future generations, to promote new models of scholarly communication, and to help deepen community understanding of the value of higher education.

UT Tower and campus image credit: Earl McGehee, CC-BY, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/7452145850

 

Communities in TSW

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Recent Submissions

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Tropidurus hispidus (Neotropical Lava Lizard). Diet and Saurophagy.
(Herpetological Review, 2024-02-12) Barbosa Filho, Márcio Luiz Vargas; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Siciliano, Salvatore
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The Issue of School Belonging: An Investigation into Resource Access and Classroom Environment at UT Austin
(2021-05) Lee, Erica
Colleges, the University of Texas at Austin (UT) included, have seen increasing numbers of students with non-dominant identities enroll in their programs. Some students hold more than one of these identities (e.g., first-generation, LGBTQIA+), giving them unique experiences as the effects of those identities must be considered together (e.g. the experience of a Black woman is different from that of a queer Black woman). Because students with multiple non-dominant identities lack the social capital of individuals who have only one or no non-dominant identities (e.g., someone who is a White Christian English-speaking male), they have more difficult pathways to achieving a sense of belonging on university campuses. That feeling of belonging is an important factor in academic achievement and overall rates of college completion. Resources and resource access are critical to give students the support they need to feel a sense of belonging. This thesis reviews two previous studies on school belonging: GenEquity (2020) and You Belong Here (2019). I also analyze data from working groups I helped conduct as part of an Actions that Promote Community Transformation (ACT) project on pedagogical caring. In going through these three studies, I break down reasons students do or do not access resources in the UT classroom. Three of the key reasons that emerged were financial barriers (e.g., paying for healthcare, working a job), campus climate (e.g., racism, representation), and bureaucracy (e.g., policies, administration). I end the paper with a reflection on the ACT project and recommendations on how UT can help break down barriers to resource access to increase feelings of belonging. I recommend that UT consolidates resources, builds better structures to foster community, and improves pedagogical caring.
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Strange Bedfellows: Understanding the Motives Behind the U.S.-Saudi Relationship from 1961-2016
(2021-05) Lee, Katie C.
After Jamal Khashoggi’s murder, many Americans questioned why the United States, a proud democracy, continued to work alongside the repressive Saudi monarchy. This thesis addresses this question and explains how this partnership evolved between 1961 and 2016. Throughout this work, I explore the principal interests that drove and maintained the U.S.-Saudi relationship over time. Although the United States claimed to champion human rights in its foreign policy decision-making, I argue that mutual oil and security interests, rather than liberal reform, directed the two countries’ relations.
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Technology Diffusion Through the Lens of Central Bank Digital Currencies
(2021-05) Leake, Avery
This paper seeks to examine the ways policy, technology, commercial environment, and global interaction contribute to the ways national governments are approaching and developing of Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs). This research has a number of applications: 1) the state of global technological diffusion, which can be forecast based on national disposition towards CBDCs, a benchmark that allows to compare all nations using their approach to currency, 2) the shifting landscape of global reserve currencies, and 3) the ways governments are adapting to an increasingly digitalized and technologically advanced global financial system. This paper maps the initiation of CBDC projects around the world and develops a logistic regression model to describe the set of circumstances that need to occur for a given country to begin developing a CBDC. This paper analyzes the influence various indicators might have on future monetary technology development and will forecast the landscape of Central Bank Digital Currencies in coming years.
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When Life Doesn't Work: The Ethics and Conflict of Texas Law on Medical Futility
(2021-05) Justin, Raga
This thesis is a journalistic exploration of one Texas policy that regulates issues of  medical futility and end-of- life care. The Texas Advance Directives Act provides a mechanism to resolve dispu tes around life- sustaining treatment when surrogate decision makers clash with doctors as to the b est outcome for a patient. The policy is a complex and oft- misunderstood one. Advocates, mostly on the medical and institutional side, have f ought in numerous legislative sessions to keep it; its naysayers are a small, but voc al minority.  In this paper, I intend to provide a clear overview of the Act and reveal how it has im pacted stakeholders in the state. The bulk of research comes from interviews with  many academic experts, advocates, politicians, doctors and family members. I first  outline the history of the Texas Advance Directives Act and give contextual informat ion about its passage, reform efforts, and comparative laws and policies in other sta tes. Then, I examine the ethical and professional obligations of those in medicine, e specially when it comes to medical futility. Finally, I analyze the Texas Advance Dire ctives Act through religious, ethical and legal views –  three very different but vital lenses in determining the efficacy of this law and how it  should be, if at all, amended.