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dc.creatorWestphal, J. D.en
dc.creatorSeidel, M. D. L.en
dc.creatorStewart, K. J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-16T13:57:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-16T13:57:27Zen
dc.date.issued2001-12en
dc.identifier.citationJames D. Westphal, Marc-David L. Seidel and Katherine J. Stewart. Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 717-747. DOI: 10.2307/3094829en
dc.identifier.issn0001-8392en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/29301en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines whether board interlock ties facilitate second-order imitation, in which firms imitate an underlying decision process that can be adapted to multiple policy domains, rather than imitating specific policies of tied-to firms (first-order imitation). Longitudinal analyses of archival data for a large sample of Forbes/Fortune 500 companies, as well as analyses of survey data on mimetic processes among these firms, show that network ties to firms that use imitation to determine a particular policy can prompt use of imitation by the focal firm in. determining both that policy and a different policy. Firms that have board network ties to firms in other industries that imitate their competitors' business strategy are likely to imitate their own competitors' business strategy, as well as their competitors' acquisition activity and compensation policy. Thus, the findings reveal network effects that are not visible with extant perspectives on interorganizational imitation. We discuss implications for institutional theory and research on interorganizational networks.en
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to UT Digital Repository: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en
dc.subjectfirm performanceen
dc.subjectinterorganizational imitationen
dc.subjectinterlockingen
dc.subjectdirectoratesen
dc.subjectcompetitive advantageen
dc.subjectmanagerial discretionen
dc.subjectcorporate-strategyen
dc.subjectceo compensationen
dc.subjectdecision-makingen
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.subjectindustryen
dc.subjectbusinessen
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.titleSecond-Order Imitation: Uncovering Latent Effects Of Board Network Tiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.departmentManagementen
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/3094829en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorWestphal, James D.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorSeidel, Marc-David L.en
dc.relation.ispartofserialAdministrative Science Quarterlyen_US


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