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dc.creatorElkins, Zachary
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-08T21:26:59Z
dc.date.available2012-04-08T21:26:59Z
dc.date.created2000-04
dc.date.issued2012-04-08
dc.identifier.citation"Gradations of Democracy? Empirical Tests of Alternative Conceptualizations." 2000. American Journal of Political Science 44: 293-300.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/15335
dc.description.abstractA group of influential scholars has argued emphatically that democracy should be measured dichotomously. This position challenges--on both theoretical and methodological grounds--the widespread practice of measuring democracy with graded scales, a practice which has been endorsed by leading methodologists who study democracy. This article proposes several empirical tests that evaluate the competing strategies. The evidence suggests that, on the whole, graded measures have superior validity and reliability. Hence, we should understand that specific cases correspond to the concept of democracy to varying degrees--degrees that can and should be measured.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Journal of Political Scienceen_US
dc.publisherMidwest Political Science Associationen_US
dc.subjectMethodologyen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.subjectDichotomousen_US
dc.subjectDemocracyen_US
dc.subjectGradationen_US
dc.subjectContinuousen_US
dc.subjectGradations of Democracyen_US
dc.subjectVariablesen_US
dc.subjectQuantitativeen_US
dc.titleGradations of Democracy? Empirical Tests of Alternative Conceptualizationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentGovernmenten_US


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