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dc.creatorBennett, Brett Michael
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T19:04:41Z
dc.date.available2012-11-13T19:04:41Z
dc.date.created2010-12
dc.date.issued2012-11-13
dc.date.submittedDecember 2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-12-2267
dc.descriptiontext
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation draws from national and regional archives to argue that many important aspects of forestry science, education, and culture in colonial Australia, India, and South Africa developed according to unique local environmental, political, social, and cultural influences. Local environmental constraints, combined with unique cultures of experimentation, encouraged the innovation of new scientific methods for forming timber plantations that differed from existing European and British methods. Debates over how to create forestry schools to train foresters in each region emphasized local problems and contexts rather than focusing primarily on continental European precedents or methods. The culture of foresters in each region corresponded to local cultures and social conditions as much as to a larger imperial ethos inculcated by training in continental European or British forestry schools.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectForestry
dc.subjectBritish Empire
dc.subjectEnvironmental history
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectIndia
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectPlantations
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleLocality and empire : networks of forestry in Australia, India, and South Africa, 1843-1948
dc.title.alternativeNetworks of forestry in Australia, India, and South Africa, 1843-1948
dc.date.updated2012-11-13T19:05:16Z
dc.identifier.slug2152/ETD-UT-2010-12-2267
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.type.genrethesis*
thesis.degree.departmentHistory
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy


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