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dc.contributor.advisorGlenn, Norval D.en
dc.creatorLove, Robert William Buechner, 1982-en
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-03T21:02:19Zen
dc.date.available2009-09-03T21:02:19Zen
dc.date.issued2009-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2009-05-171en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractPersonality is powerfully predictive of behavior. Neuroticism, a personality trait from the Five Factor Model of Personality, has repeatedly been linked to relationship dissatisfaction and an increased susceptibility to eating disorders. The present investigation uses two large data sets to determine if Maximizing, the tendency to search for the very best option in an array of options, is related to marital satisfaction and body-image. Statistical analyses show that maximizers of both sexes diet more frequently, are more dissatisfied with their bodies, and value physical attractiveness in a sexual partner more than satisficers. Maximizers are less satisfied with their romantic relationships, are more likely to never marry, and more likely to get divorced once married than satisficers. Unpredicted, Maximizing was negatively correlated with Neuroticism (r = -.112, p < .01) and positively correlated with two personality traits known to be beneficial for relationships, Agreeableness (r = .182, p < .01) and Conscientiousness (r = .258, p < .01).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectMarriageen
dc.subjectRelationshipsen
dc.subjectMaximizingen
dc.subjectPersonality, Maximizingen
dc.titleMaximizing and relationshipsen
dc.description.departmentPsychologyen
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen


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