Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Timothy J., 1959-en
dc.creatorRich, Laura Brookeen
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-03T21:01:08Zen
dc.date.available2009-09-03T21:01:08Zen
dc.date.issued2009-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2009-05-157en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe theory of powerless speech suggests that speakers in powerless social positions use more “powerless” speech acts than their social superiors. This report will use two such powerless speech acts, hedges and tag questions, to examine the interplay between the power relationships of Roman comedy and the language of its characters. The results of this study show that Republican Latin does not always follow the theory’s predictions, suggesting that hedges and tag questions may not be powerless speech acts in Latin; that the theory may need to be modified in order to accommodate Latin; or that the Saturnalian nature of Roman comedy prevents the expected outcome of powerless language.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectLatinen
dc.subjectcomedyen
dc.subjectlinguisticsen
dc.subjectpoweren
dc.subjectPlautusen
dc.subjectTerenceen
dc.titleLanguage and power in Roman comedyen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRiggsby, Andrew M.en
dc.description.departmentClassicsen
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentClassicsen
thesis.degree.disciplineClassicsen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record