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dc.contributor.advisorSuri, Jeremi
dc.creatorMarshall, Christopher Russell
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-28T18:35:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-28T18:35:18Z
dc.date.created2017-05
dc.date.submittedMay 2017
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2K64B93J
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/63777
dc.description.abstractWhile power has been thought to shape international law, we are seeing that international law itself has become a source of power for developing states. This occurs as developing states use international law as a means to affect regional change. Developing states’ reliance on international law, particularly as they form coherent foreign policy against a counter-colonial background, strengthens international law as a process by which developing states express their interests. Gradually, this strengthening snowballs to where it affects change in global international law processes and, at times, can act to constrain powerful states from acting in ways that directly reflect their personal interests. Indeed, the reliance on international law may reflect that the preservation of international law processes has become a shared, global interest. This imbues international law itself with an unexpected form of power.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectInternational law
dc.subjectPower
dc.titleThe limits of powerful states : international law's power to influence the behavior of strong states
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-02-28T18:35:18Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJinks, Derek
dc.description.departmentGlobal Policy Studies
thesis.degree.departmentGlobal Policy Studies
thesis.degree.disciplineGlobal Policy Studies
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Global Policy Studies
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-8588-8624
dc.type.materialtext


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