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dc.contributor.advisorWagstaff, Lonnie H.en
dc.creatorColeman, Derrell Anthonyen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T21:24:51Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T21:24:51Zen
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifierb56732223en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/517en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractPublic school districts in Texas are required by law to operate alternative school programs for children who commit discipline infractions in violation of state law or local policy; the programs are called “disciplinary alternative education programs” or “DAEP” schools. The prevailing question driving this study was whether children who spend significant periods of time in DAEP schools are affected differently by their educational experience than the general population of students, who spend little or no time in the schools. This research is guided by the assumption that students who are assigned to DAEP facilities for greater numbers of days will be affected more than students who spend less time in the facilities. The primary findings from the study indicate that the alternative school has a different impact on the students enrolled, depending on their social and cultural characteristics. This study identifies three distinct groups of students who matriculate in the DAEP program. The study further describes how the students function and perform in the setting, from the perspective of both students and faculty. The alternative school has an immediate impact on some students, who have good educational values when they come to the campus. They perceive their entire tenure as punishment, and they know from the beginning that they will do whatever is possible to avoid getting repeat referrals. The school has no impact at all on another group of students. These students are extremely obstinate and frequently commit disciplinary infractions while at the alternative school that lead to more serious consequences. There is a third group of students for whom the alternative school has a substantial impact, which affects the goals they set for themselves and their educational values. These students develop a sense of belonging at the alternative school, and some students said they would have dropped out, if they were still attending school at their regular campus. Regrettably, this positive impact is contrary to the goals at the alternative school, which are to deter kids from committing subsequent infractions, and equip them to be successful on their regular campus. The study has revealed that no single policy or program can address the various social, cultural and academic needs of all the students attending the DAEP. The best approach to developing DAEP programs and policies is to use a model that accounts for the differences in social, cultural and academic characteristics of the students attending.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshNon-formal education--Texas--Evaluationen
dc.subject.lcshHigh school students--Education--Texasen
dc.subject.lcshSchool discipline--Texasen
dc.titleThe affect [i.e. effect] of high school disciplinary alternative education programs on students with long-term multiple referralsen
dc.description.departmentEducational Administrationen
dc.identifier.oclc55991144en
dc.identifier.proqst3099437en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Administrationen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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