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dc.contributor.advisorHindman, Heather
dc.creatorPace, Colin Gaylonen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-02T18:28:42Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05en
dc.date.submittedMay 2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/26223en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I consider historical periods, linguistic categories, and social theories in relation to Hindi in order to trace out the character and trajectory of the language. From sixteenth-century courtly contexts, to the adoption of the Devanagari script in the twentieth century by nationalists, Hindi has a polyvalent and yet specific history. I discuss these contexts in which social contact led to linguistic change and in which Hindi acquired many of the lexical, syntactical, and phonological characteristics by which it is recognized today. I conclude with a section that considers the motif of language and power, and I suggest that the production of knowledge and power in language use, offers both the means of distinction and expression or, in another sense, of hierarchy and communitas. A thread that runs throughout the paper is attention to the contexts in which language use enables elaboration and in which elaboration is eschewed in order to attain social unity. Pursuing a descriptive historical-linguistic project, I neither affirm nor deny the politics of such language use, but rather I indicate the ways in which actors and agents use Hindi to help articulate their agency.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.subjectHindien
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectLanguage useen
dc.subjectSocial unityen
dc.subjectLinguistic categoriesen
dc.subjectSocial theoriesen
dc.titleReflections on Hindi and historyen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.date.updated2014-10-02T18:28:42Zen
dc.description.departmentAsian Studiesen
thesis.degree.departmentAsian Studiesen
thesis.degree.disciplineAsian Cultures and Languagesen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen


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