Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorJarvenpaa,S.L.en
dc.contributor.advisorTomak, Keremen
dc.creatorDutta, Ranjanen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T22:22:40Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T22:22:40Zen
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.identifierb60728449en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/1898en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractAlthough practitioner research in Information Systems has touted the relevance of online payment systems as a critical element for success of e-commerce business models, the strategic needs for adopting online payment systems are still unclear to most firms. This dissertation studies how one design feature of online payment systems – pricing scheme or temporal separation of payments and consumption - may be used strategically to compete in the market for information goods. I incorporate consumer “mental accounting” (MA) from Behavioral Economics literature into a firm level model. Contrary to the predictions from traditional microeconomic theories, the results from my game theoretic models show that when consumers are assumed to maintain mental accounts, the choice of pricing schemes does matter to firms in a competitive market. An experiment is conducted to further evaluate the analytical findings. In the experiment, sellers or firms compete against one another in a simulated consumer market exhibiting MA characteristics. The experimental results reveal that the Nash Equilibrium (NE) predictions of the game theoretic models may not hold in practice due to (i) market dominance of one firm over the other (ii) variations in market MA characteristics and (iii) differences in other payment system design features. The results of this dissertation not only offer insights about the strategic importance of online payment systems but also provide an explanation as to how economic and behavioral aspects of digital consumption may interact with one another.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshPaymenten
dc.subject.lcshElectronic funds transfersen
dc.titleTemporal separation of payments and consumption in online payment systems and their impact on firm strategiesen
dc.description.departmentEconomicsen
dc.identifier.oclc67107747en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEconomicsen
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record