Administration of teacher education in colleges and universities

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1936

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The purpose of this study is to ascertain, as far as possible, the policies and practices that prevail in connection with the administration of teacher education programs in the colleges and universities which are members of the Association of American Universities and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The following administrative factors are considered: (1) the form of organization of professional facilities for the education of teachers; (2 ) the year students are first admitted to the professional organization for the education of teachers; (3) the year students are first admitted to courses in education; (4) the special requirements that prevail for admission to the professional organization for the education of teachers; (5) the types of departmentalization of course offerings; (6) admission of students of other schools, colleges, or departments, within an institution to courses in education; (7) the amount of education offered, in number of courses and number of semester hours, by the individual institutions of the study; (8) the total course offerings under the various classifications of descriptive terms found in the titles of education courses; (9) degrees granted involving education, including degrees in education, degrees with major in education, and degrees with credit in education; (10) the highest degrees held by members of the education faculties; (11) the ranks assigned to members of education faculties by the various institutions; (12) the objectives announced by the teacher educating organizations; (13) the extent to which education courses are offered in the lower division, upper division, and graduate division, respectively; (14) the systems of numbering courses; (15) types of term plan; and (16) credit values, in semester hours, assigned to courses in education. [...] The data upon which this study is based were derived largely from bulletins or announcements of the member institutions of the Association of American Universities and the Southern Association of Colleges. Current bulletins were secured from all of the institutions. In most instances the announcements are for the academic year 1935-1936, while in rare cases they are for either the biennium 1934-1936 or 1935-1937. In the event the printed materials were not sufficiently explicit or complete on any point involved in the study, a special letter of inquiry was sent to the institution concerned. [...] Included in the study are 27 institutions in the Association of American Universities, 101 institutions of senior level in the Southern Association of Colleges, and 35 junior colleges in the latter association, making a total of 163 institutions

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