A study of principals and teachers perceptions of school technology and readiness

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2011-05

Authors

Adams, Willie James

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Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to determine what factors influence the integration of educational technology as perceived by Texas teachers. The secondary purpose was to examine the relationships between the determinant factors. This study answered the following questions: 1) Are there significant differences in teachers’ perception of school technology and readiness across grade level and subject area? 2) Are there significant differences in teacher-principal technology readiness congruence across school percentage of economically disadvantaged students? 3) How do teachers’ perceived levels of technology readiness predict student mastery of Technology Applications (TA) TEKS? To address the research questions quantitative procedures were followed to investigate whether significant relationships existed among dependent variables, school technology and readiness, and teacher-principal school technology and readiness congruence, and the independent variables (a) grade level, (b) subject area, and (c) percentage of economically disadvantaged students. Data analysis indicated significant differences in teacher school technology and readiness perceptions by grade level and subject area, and significant differences in teacher-principal school technology and readiness congruence by school percentage of economically disadvantaged students. Using path analysis a theorized Texas School Technology and Readiness Effects Model was validated. The findings were that (a) teachers in higher grade levels and more technical subject areas perceived their school technology and readiness at significantly higher levels; (b) as the percentage of economically disadvantaged student increased in a school, teachers perceived their school technology readiness at lower levels and were less congruent between their perceived school technology and readiness and their principals’ ratings of the teachers’ school technology and readiness; and (c) Leadership Administration and Instructional Support, followed by Infrastructure for Technology, Educator Preparation and Development, and Instruction Practice were the main drivers for student mastery of Technology Applications (TA) related Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS).

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