Depositional architecture and geochemical evolution in Permian Capitan platforms of the Delaware Basin, Texas and New Mexico

dc.contributor.advisorKerans, C. (Charles), 1954-
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTinker, Scott W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMartindale, Rowan C.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLarson, Toti
dc.contributor.committeeMemberZahm, Christopher Kent
dc.creatorSmith, Benjamin Paul
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-3189-8717
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T14:37:28Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T14:37:28Z
dc.date.created2019-08
dc.date.issued2019-09-26
dc.date.submittedAugust 2019
dc.date.updated2019-11-01T14:37:29Z
dc.description.abstractGeochemical data from carbonate sediments are used to constrain chemical changes in ancient oceans. Marine carbonates can be representative of the global ocean, but many ancient carbonates precipitated in isolated water masses such as restricted basins and interior seaways. As a result, geochemical and paleontological records from isolated basins may reflect both global environmental forcing and local water mass evolution. Understanding the interaction between global and local palaeoceanographic change is a key step in unravelling enigmatic marine biotic crises such as the Mid-Capitanian extinction. This study examines factors controlling salinity, stratification, and oxygenation in the Capitanian (Middle Permian) Delaware Basin, USA. Elemental and carbon isotope measurements from time-equivalent strata reveal differences between shallow- and deep- water masses, pointing to local controls such as stratification and de-oxygenated bottom water. Basinal dolomites and evaporites mark periods of elevated salinity commonly tied to sea-level lowstands, which correlate with turnover in fusulinid and brachiopod communities. Faunal turnover in the Delaware Basin demonstrates a fundamental attribute of restricted basin settings: water chemistry is often tightly coupled to physical process such as sea level change. We suggest that the relationships among sea level change, chemical changes, and biotic turnover may explain why the Capitanian mass extinction was more severe in isolated basins than the open ocean.
dc.description.departmentEarth and Planetary Sciences
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/78220
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5309
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPermian
dc.subjectCarbonate
dc.subjectSequence stratigraphy
dc.subjectChemostratigraphy
dc.subjectDelaware Basin
dc.subjectGuadalupian
dc.titleDepositional architecture and geochemical evolution in Permian Capitan platforms of the Delaware Basin, Texas and New Mexico
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentGeological Sciences
thesis.degree.disciplineGeological Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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