An early reading intervention to reduce the risk for reading failure : outcomes and perceptions of implementation

Date

2022-11-22

Authors

Howard, Sonja Lynnette

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

Students who live in poverty often struggle to learn to read. The percentage of students experiencing reading difficulties in the first years of schooling can be reduced by the use of high-quality instruction and intervention (Reynolds et al., 2011). School district leaders need to understand the outcomes and challenges of reading programs designed to ameliorate reading difficulties among at-risk students. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine the outcomes and perceptions of implementation of an early reading program in a high minority, high poverty suburban school district. The academic outcomes of kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students who participated in an early reading intervention were compared to kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students who qualified but did not participate. The perceptions of the campus-level staff stakeholders who worked with these students were analyzed. This study used an explanatory sequential format for the mixed methods case study design. For the quantitative analysis of this study, reading scores of students in kindergarten, first grade and second grade who received the reading program tutoring were compared to students in kindergarten, first grade and second grade who did not receive reading program tutoring. Archived student data was collected from each of the grade-level cohorts from three school years (2018-2021) for students who qualified for, were selected to participate, and participated in the reading program for a minimum of 12 weeks. A survey provided perception of implementation information as well as allowed for recruiting participants to the next phase of the study that involves collecting and analyzing qualitative data through three separate focus group interviews. For the reading tutor focus group, two tutors were randomly selected from survey participants. Tutors who participated in the study were those who received formal training and provided reading program tutoring to six to 10 students for a minimum of 12 weeks. For the coach focus group, three coaches who supported and coached tutors in the reading tutoring program were randomly selected from the survey participants. For the principal focus group, two principals were randomly selected from the survey participants. The qualitative data were analyzed, and thematic findings were generated. The findings may help the study district gain an understanding of the practices that help prevent and intervene for reading difficulties in young children. The study district may use the findings to determine if the goals of the program are being met and potentially use that information to determine if the intervention program is worth the cost.

Description

LCSH Subject Headings

Citation