Depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample

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2005-05-21

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Study 1 examined: 1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample, and 2) the mediational role of smoking self-efficacy in this relationship. Findings indicated that individuals high in depressive symptoms smoked significantly more cigarettes per day than did those with low depressive symptoms. Further, among current smokers, smoking self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. Study 2 examined the longitudinal relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. Survey data were collected at 6 months and 12 months subsequent to baseline. Although depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking were highly stable over time in this sample, in exploratory analyses a significant relationship between depressive symptoms and smoking across assessments was found. Overall, findings for Study 1 and Study 2 add to accumulating evidence that depressive symptoms are a risk factor for increased cigarette smoking. Implications for smoking cessation and prevention programs are discussed

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