Equality of educational opportunity between low-income and well-off students : school and family inputs in two national cohorts of high school students

dc.contributor.advisorGershoff, Elizabeth T.en
dc.contributor.advisorvon Hippel, Paul T.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHuston, Aletha Cen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCrosnoe, Roberten
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBenner, Aprile Den
dc.creatorHolas, Igoren
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-9110-4451en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T13:23:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-01T13:23:13Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.date.submittedAugust 2015en
dc.date.updated2015-10-01T13:23:13Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractWhy do low-income students achieve lower test scores and attain less education than their better off peers? Can we close these gaps through redistribution of school funds? Fifty years ago the Coleman Report (Coleman et al., 1966) suggested that school resources had surprisingly little to do with these achievement gaps, and that school segregation, along with family background, were the primary drivers. In this dissertation I present two studies on two nationally representative cohorts of high school students (high school class of 1992 and 2004). In Study 1, I describe the differences between low- income and well-off students’ families (income, structure, home-language, and parental education), school resources (class size and teacher salary), student body characteristics, school and family interpersonal processes, and finally educational outcomes (test scores and attainment). In Study 2, I pursue a structural model to determine whether school resources or family characteristics relate more strongly to students’ outcomes, and to identify the mechanisms of influence. In both studies I explore changes in these relations for the two cohorts. Results from Study 1 indicate that low-income students differ from well off students on their family characteristics, characteristics of peers in school, and outcomes, but differences are slight on school funding or resources. Findings from Study 2 indicate that family background and school segregation relate the strongest to students’ outcomes with school funding and resources showing only weak relations.en
dc.description.departmentHuman Development and Family Sciencesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2XS3Hen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31466en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEducation policyen
dc.subjectEducation fundingen
dc.subjectAchievement gapsen
dc.subjectIncome inequalityen
dc.subjectSegregationen
dc.subjectAttainmenten
dc.titleEquality of educational opportunity between low-income and well-off students : school and family inputs in two national cohorts of high school studentsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentHuman Development and Family Sciencesen
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman development and family sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen

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