The fox trot in a nation of cosmopolitans : music and race in early twentieth-century Guatemala

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Robin D., 1964-en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberO'Meara, Carolineen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCandelaria, Lorenzoen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBurnett, Virginia Gen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKeeler, Warden
dc.creatorAmado Pineda, Andres Robertoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-06T19:48:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-06T19:48:59Zen
dc.date.issued2013-08en
dc.date.submittedAugust 2013en
dc.date.updated2015-10-06T19:48:59Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I explore musical importations in early twentieth-century Guatemala, particularly the fox trot, and their relationship to notions of cosmopolitanism, race, and national identity. Although Guatemalans may boast that the son is their national music—a genre often associated with local indigenous traditions—examination of the national marimba repertoire reveals that its most predominant styles derive from foreign music and dances that circulated transnationally in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Such a realization raises questions about the role of indigeneity in national discourse. I argue that Ladinos (non-indigenous or mixed Guatemalans) imported the fox trot and other musical forms to construct a national identity predicated on racialized notions of modernity and cosmopolitanism. The fox trot, a dance derived from African-American ragtime traditions, enjoyed worldwide popularity for nearly two decades due in part to its ability to mediate constructs of whiteness and blackness that fit presentist ideas of modernity: blackness represented a primitive alterity while whiteness evoked a modern and civilized society. Analyses of racial discourse among Ladinos and its implications for the national instrument (chapter 2), the stylistic features of Guatemalan national repertoire (chapter 3), and the subjects that locally-composed fox trots reference through titles, cover art, and musical styles (chapters 4 and 5) demonstrate that many elements of the fox trot, along with their connotations of modernity and race, resonated with the cosmopolitan sensibilities of Ladinos. Their preference for international as opposed to local forms suggest a fundamental ambivalence towards indigeneity and its centrality to national culture.en
dc.description.departmentMusicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T24S4Ren
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31566en
dc.subjectGuatemalaen
dc.subjectRaceen
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectNationalismen
dc.subjectModernityen
dc.subjectCosmopolitanismen
dc.subjectMarimbaen
dc.subjectFox troten
dc.titleThe fox trot in a nation of cosmopolitans : music and race in early twentieth-century Guatemalaen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentMusicen
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen

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