PhD Student Symposium

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2020-08-12

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Salem Center

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July 30, 2020 PhD Student Symposium August 12, 2020 PhD Symposium Speaker Affiliations and Program PhD Symposium Student Papers The McCombs School of Business, through its newly established Salem Center for Policy, hosted an online doctoral student symposium on August 12, 2020 designed for Ph.D. candidates in finance, accounting, and economics who are in the process of developing a financial markets research program. Students engaged with researchers from leading universities, industry, and regulatory agencies to learn how policymakers use academic research to evaluate the efficacy of markets, respond to financial system disruptions, and implement reform measures. A series of panel discussions introduced students to active policy issues, open research questions, and how current developments can motivate and shape a research agenda, including through the lens of journal editors. Selected students presented their working papers and research ideas to program participants, and uniquely received combined feedback from academics, practitioners, and regulators. Promoting the relevance of academic research in the design, implementation, and evaluation of financial market regulation. Through events, analysis, and commentary, the program on financial markets regulation aims to elevate the role evidence-based decision making in the policy development process. Bringing the rigor of peer-reviewed research to decision-makers can mitigate the bias and conflicts that underlie many proposed regulatory actions, and lead to more balanced consideration of competing interests and perspectives among financial market participants. To achieve this, each initiative is focused on raising awareness of where evidence in support of financial market policy is needed, promoting regulator engagement with academic experts, and creating incentives for academics to apply their expertise to policy issues by measuring the relevance of their contributions to regulatory outcomes.

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