Black Hole Feedback On The First Galaxies

dc.contributor.utaustinauthorJeon, Myoungwonen
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorPawlik, Andreas H.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorGreif, Thomas H.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorGlover, Simon C. O.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorBromm, Volkeren
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorMilosavljević, Milošen
dc.creatorJeon, M.en
dc.creatorPawlik, A. H.en
dc.creatorGreif, T. H.en
dc.creatorGlover, S. C. O.en
dc.creatorBromm, V.en
dc.creatorMilosavljevic, M.en
dc.creatorKlessen, R. S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-16T13:57:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-16T13:57:54Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.description.abstractWe study how the first galaxies were assembled under feedback from the accretion onto a central black hole (BH) that is left behind by the first generation of metal-free stars through self-consistent, cosmological simulations. X-ray radiation from the accretion of gas onto BH remnants of Population III (Pop III) stars, or from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), again involving Pop III stars, influences the mode of second generation star formation. We track the evolution of the black hole accretion rate and the associated X-ray feedback starting with the death of the Pop III progenitor star inside a minihalo and following the subsequent evolution of the black hole as the minihalo grows to become an atomically cooling galaxy. We find that X-ray photoionization heating from a stellar-mass BH is able to quench further star formation in the host halo at all times before the halo enters the atomic cooling phase. X-ray radiation from a HMXB, assuming a luminosity close to the Eddington value, exerts an even stronger, and more diverse, feedback on star formation. It photoheats the gas inside the host halo, but also promotes the formation of molecular hydrogen and cooling of gas in the intergalactic medium and in nearby minihalos, leading to a net increase in the number of stars formed at early times. Our simulations further show that the radiative feedback from the first BHs may strongly suppress early BH growth, thus constraining models for the formation of supermassive BHs.en
dc.description.departmentAstronomyen
dc.identifier.citationMyoungwon Jeon, Andreas H. Pawlik, Thomas H. Greif, Simon C. O. Glover, Volker Bromm, Miloš Milosavljević and Ralf S. Klessen. AIP Conference Proceedings 1480, 325 (Sep.,2012); doi: 10.1063/1.4754376en
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.4754376en
dc.identifier.issn0094-243Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/29336en
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.relation.ispartofserialFirst Stars Iv - from Hayashi to the Futureen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to UT Digital Repository: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en
dc.subjectcosmologyen
dc.subjectgalaxiesen
dc.subjectblack holeen
dc.subjectfeedbacken
dc.subjectenrichmenten
dc.subjectstaren
dc.subjectastronomy & astrophysicsen
dc.titleBlack Hole Feedback On The First Galaxiesen
dc.typeConference proceedingsen

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