An evaluation of preference of delays to reinforcement on choice responding : a translational study

dc.contributor.advisorFalcomata, Terry S.
dc.creatorShpall, Cayenne Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-10T21:47:35Z
dc.date.available2020-03-10T21:47:35Z
dc.date.created2019-12
dc.date.issued2020-02-05
dc.date.submittedDecember 2019
dc.date.updated2020-03-10T21:47:35Z
dc.description.abstractDelays to reinforcement are often a necessary component during treatments of challenging behavior (e.g., Functional Communication Training; FCT). In the absence of programmed delay training, the utility and generality of FCT may be limited. Despite the importance of delays to reinforcement during FCT, few studies have empirically isolated and investigated the parameters pertaining to the implementation of delays to reinforcement. Results from basic empirical studies have shown that variable delays, or bi-valued mixed delays to reinforcement, are preferred in humans and nonhuman studies. The current research examined response allocation between fixed and mixed delays to reinforcement using a concurrent schedule of reinforcement. Results showed preference for mixed delays to reinforcement with 4 out of 4 participants. Potential avenues of future research on the use of mixed delays to reinforcement, such as the application within FCT and maintenance of socially appropriate behaviors, are discussed.
dc.description.departmentSpecial Education
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/80243
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/7262
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectDelay to reinforcement
dc.subjectMixed delays to reinforcement
dc.subjectFunctional Communication Training
dc.subjectChallenging behavior
dc.subjectTreatment
dc.titleAn evaluation of preference of delays to reinforcement on choice responding : a translational study
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentSpecial Education
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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