Effects of parent–child intergenerational cultural discrepancies on Korean-American young adults’ psychological well-being, through communication quality, mattering, and autonomy support

dc.contributor.advisorSuizzo, Marie-Anne
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFalbo, Toni
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchallert, Diane
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKeating, Xiaofen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarlson, Cindy
dc.creatorLee, Yookyung, Ph.D.
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-1839-1594
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-16T20:51:34Z
dc.date.available2021-07-16T20:51:34Z
dc.date.created2021-05
dc.date.issued2021-05-07
dc.date.submittedMay 2021
dc.date.updated2021-07-16T20:51:35Z
dc.description.abstractKorean-Americans are one of the fastest-growing racial subgroups, representing 0.4% of the total population of the U.S. as of 2019. Many Korean-American immigrant families consist of Korea-raised parents and their 1.5- or second-generation children. Because these families experience both mainstream and heritage cultures, cultural discrepancies may arise between the children and their immigrant parents. The main purpose of this study is to examine the mediating effects of parent–child communication quality, mattering to parents, and parental autonomy support on the relationship between intergenerational cultural discrepancies and psychological well-being, among Korean-American young adults. Participants were recruited through Korean-American communities in the U.S. and participated in this study through an online survey and follow-up one-on-one video interviews. A total of 161 Korean-American young adults between age 18 and 34 (M age = 23.14) were included in the final sample for the survey study, and 10 of the 161 also participated in the follow-up interview study. A mixed methods approach, including several mediation models and interview analysis, was used to test the hypotheses of this study. Key results from the quantitative analyses showed that greater parent–child intergenerational cultural discrepancies affected their lower communication quality, and this lower communication quality subsequently affected lower mattering to parents, but this lower mattering did not affected children’s depressive symptoms (Model 1). Also, greater parent–child intergenerational cultural discrepancies affected both lower parent–child communication quality and less parental autonomy support at the same time, which in turn affected lower levels of young adults’ life satisfaction (Model 2). The qualitative results provide a rich description of specific examples of these effects and possible reasons for the quantitative results. In addition, the participants shared messages to their parents during their adolescence as well as advice for current Korean-American adolescents who may face similar experiences. The results of this study support and extend the findings of previous work linking parent–child intergenerational cultural discrepancies to children’s psychological adjustment in immigrant families, as well as those linking parent–child communication, mattering to parents, and parental autonomy support. Future studies could investigate whether these relationships are different between mother–child and father–child dyads, and whether these results have any Korean-specific characteristics, by comparing them with results from young adults in other ethnic groups.
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychologyeng
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/86862
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/13813
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectIntergenerational cultural discrepancy
dc.subjectIntergenerational cultural conflict
dc.subjectPsychological well-being
dc.subjectKorean-American
dc.subjectYoung adults
dc.subjectAdulthood
dc.subjectEmerging adulthood
dc.subjectAdolescence
dc.subjectAdolescents
dc.subjectParenting
dc.subjectParental autonomy support
dc.subjectMattering
dc.subjectParent-child communication
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectCommunication quality
dc.subjectLife satisfaction
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectDepressive symptoms
dc.subjectAcculturation
dc.subjectCommunication quality
dc.subjectParent-child relationship
dc.subjectImmigrant
dc.subjectMixed method
dc.subjectMediation
dc.subjectSerial mediation
dc.subjectParallel mediation
dc.subjectEast Asian American family conflicts scale
dc.subjectParent–adolescent communication scale
dc.subjectParental academic socialization questionnaire
dc.subjectPASQ
dc.subjectThe Center for Epidemiologic Studies depression scale
dc.subjectCES-D
dc.subjectThe Satisfaction with Life scale
dc.subjectSWLS
dc.titleEffects of parent–child intergenerational cultural discrepancies on Korean-American young adults’ psychological well-being, through communication quality, mattering, and autonomy support
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
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