Virtual movements : populist rhetoric, technology, and hegemony

dc.contributor.advisorGunn, Joshua, 1973-
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDavis, D D
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJarvis, Sharon
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBrummett, Barry
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCloud, Dana
dc.creatorMorris, Matthew B.
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-6204-3634
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T17:14:55Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T17:14:55Z
dc.date.created2017-08
dc.date.issued2017-08-08
dc.date.submittedAugust 2017
dc.date.updated2018-02-05T17:14:56Z
dc.description.abstractAfter the Financial Crisis of 2008, The Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street both claimed to be “The People” seeking representation. Each of these movements had very different narratives about the flaws in our political system, and each movement proposed conflicting solutions. In this dissertation, I offer the theory of virtual movements as a way of understanding the role media technologies play in shaping our political perceptions as groups struggle for hegemony. I analyze the narrative of the Tea Party as it is disseminated through conservative media with a broadcast structure that emphasizes fidelity to an idealized past as the solution to our current problems; For Occupy, the rejection of representation and desire to embody direct democracy without mediation relies upon a metaphysics of presence modeled on social media in which the ideal is a simulation of immediacy. Each of these movements claimed to operate without a leader, but reproduced a system of authority through their dependence on technology.
dc.description.departmentCommunication Studies
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2ST7FD4T
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/63468
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectSocial movements
dc.subjectMedia
dc.subjectPopulism
dc.subjectTechnology
dc.subjectHegemony
dc.subjectTea Party
dc.subjectOccupy Wall Street
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.titleVirtual movements : populist rhetoric, technology, and hegemony
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentCommunication Studies
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication Studies
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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