Risk factors associated with compromised birth outcomes among Mexican origin population in El Paso, Texas: a postpartum hospital study

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2005

Authors

González Ramírez, Raúl S.

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This dissertation examines compromised birth outcomes among Mexican Americans and Mexican women who delivered infants at Thomason Hospital in El Paso, Texas, using a survey that was carried out between 1995 and 1997. Sociodemographic, behavior, and biomedical variables are included to study the birth outcomes. Descriptive analyses and multinomial logistic regression are used to analyze the data. Mexican-Americans were more likely to deliver preterm infants (light or heavy), while they showed no differences with Mexican-born women regarding IUGR infants. The disadvantage of Mexican-American women remains, even after controlling for their higher level of education and advantages regarding some other characteristics. It is worth noting that they showed a higher proportion of smoking and drinking. One of the key variables that explain the differences is that Mexican-Americans have a higher percentage of women becoming a mother at ages younger than 20 years old.

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