Creating Student-Staffed Writing Centers, Grades 6-12

Date

2006

Authors

Kent, Richard

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

Description

Each spring, a slew of college tutors graduate and head off to teach in grades 6-12. Most of those tutors loved working at their college writing centers; yet, very few will start writing centers at their new schools. True, writing centers have not been a significant part of the k-12 landscape, but after the success of their post-secondary counterparts, perhaps they should be. As a former high school English teacher and writing center director, I’ve heard countless arguments against having writing centers in secondary schools. Here are a few: Students aren't skilled at working with one another. It's the teacher's job to “correct” papers. What would I do as a teacher if I didn't take student papers home with me to correct? Teachers have enough to do without creating more duties. Our school doesn’t have space for a writing center. We don't have people to staff a center. A writing center will cost too much money. If you’re a college writing center tutor or professional staffer, you probably have answers to some of the above. For example, you’ve witnessed students working with students, and you know first-hand that this approach does work. Indeed, those of us who have started secondary writing centers have found solutions to most, if not all of these arguments.

LCSH Subject Headings

Citation