Learning to teach, teaching to learn : a longitudinal case study of becoming a literacy teacher

dc.contributor.advisorHoffman, James V.
dc.contributor.advisorMaloch, Beth
dc.creatorRussell, Katherine Wintonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-09T21:08:51Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.date.submittedDecember 2014en
dc.date.updated2015-02-09T21:08:51Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis longitudinal case study followed a beginning teacher from the first semester of her teacher education program into her fifth year of teaching. Using situated learning theory, this dissertation reports the influences on her journey in becoming a literacy teacher before, during, and after her teacher education program. Data sources included interviews, classroom observations, and documents that were collected over six and a half years and across multiple contexts (e.g., tutoring, student teaching, community-based learning, coursework, two elementary schools). Using constant comparative (Glaser & Strauss, 2009) and longitudinal coding methods (Saldaña, 2009), the analysis suggests that the participant developed the following understandings over time and across contexts: she intends to be a lifelong learner; she values and validates students’ interests, histories, and contributions; she is committed to teaching for social justice; and she believes a safe, trusting, and flexible community is essential to learning. Findings indicated that her ability to enact these understandings in practice, even in difficult school contexts, was made possible by her reflective stance and her commitment to surrounding herself with communities of like-minded people to support her in similar ways as had been the case in her teacher education program. The results of this study provide evidence that over time the understandings developed in a teacher education program have the potential to fully emerge in practice inside teachers’ classrooms. This study has implications for how we prepare teachers, how teacher education programs can continue to support their graduates, the types of school communities that seem to support beginning teachers, and how policy makers might direct future funding towards responsible teacher education.en
dc.description.departmentCurriculum and Instructionen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/28374en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTeacher educationen
dc.subjectLiteracy teachingen
dc.subjectLongitudinalen
dc.subjectLearning to teachen
dc.subjectCase studyen
dc.subjectBecoming a teacheren
dc.subjectSituated learningen
dc.titleLearning to teach, teaching to learn : a longitudinal case study of becoming a literacy teacheren
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentCurriculum and Instructionen
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instructionen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen

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