The First Supernova Explosions: Energetics, Feedback, And Chemical Enrichment

Date

2007-11

Authors

Greif, Thomas H.
Johnson, Jarrett L.
Bromm, Volker
Klessen, Ralf S.

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Abstract

We perform three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations in a realistic cosmological setting to investigate the expansion, feedback, and chemical enrichment properties of a 200M(circle dot) pair-instability supernova in the high-redshift universe. We find that the SN remnant propagates for a Hubble time at z similar or equal to 20 to a final mass-weighted mean shock radius of 2.5 kpc (proper), roughly half the size of the H II region, and in this process sweeps up a total gas mass of 2: 5; 10(5) M-circle dot. The morphology of the shock becomes highly anisotropic once it leaves the host halo and encounters filaments and neighboring minihalos, while the bulk of the shock propagates into the voids of the intergalactic medium. The SN entirely disrupts the host halo and terminates further star formation for at least 200 Myr, while in our specific case it exerts positive mechanical feedback on neighboring minihalos by shock-compressing their cores. In contrast, we do not observe secondary star formation in the dense shell via gravitational fragmentation, due to the previous photoheating by the progenitor star. We find that cooling by metal lines is unimportant for the entire evolution of the SN remnant, while the metal-enriched, interior bubble expands adiabatically into the cavities created by the shock, and ultimately into the voids with a maximum extent similar to the final mass-weighted mean shock radius. Finally, we conclude that dark matter halos of at least M-vir greater than or similar to 10(8) M-circle dot must be assembled to recollect all components of the swept-up gas.

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Citation

Greif, Thomas H., Jarrett L. Johnson, Volker Bromm, and Ralf S. Klessen. "The first supernova explosions: Energetics, feedback, and chemical enrichment." The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 670, No. 1 (Nov., 2007): 1.