The U.S. Navy’s Loss of Command of the Seas to China and How to Regain It (Winter 2021)

dc.creatorSestak, Joe
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-24T14:59:51Z
dc.date.available2021-02-24T14:59:51Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.description.abstractIn 2005, a U.S. Navy plan was forwarded to Congress: It entailed reducing force structure and transforming to a capabilities-based forward force posture. However, the Navy continued to pursue unattainable force levels and, today, has lost command of the seas to China in the Western Pacific. China’s pace of war is the speed of light through cyberspace, leaving U.S. forces blind and deaf, while America’s is 30 knots, taking weeks to arrive at the fight. A fundamental shift in mindset needs to be made. The focus should no longer be on the number of hulls, but on a return to the plan for a capabilities-based, more forward force posture, primarily by commanding cyberspace in order to regain command of the seas.en_US
dc.description.departmentLBJ School of Public Affairsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/84733
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/11704
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas National Security Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas National Security Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas National Security Review;Vol 4, Iss 1
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.subjectTNSR Vol. 4, Iss. 1en_US
dc.subjectU.S. Navyen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectcyberspaceen_US
dc.titleThe U.S. Navy’s Loss of Command of the Seas to China and How to Regain It (Winter 2021)en_US
dc.typeJournalen_US

Access full-text files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
TNSRVol4Issue1Sestak.pdf
Size:
687.76 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:

License bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.64 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: