Time signatures : music and sound design in Doctor Who (1963–89, 1996, 2005-)

dc.contributor.advisorBuhler, James, 1964-en
dc.contributor.advisorAlmén, Byron, 1968-en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarson, Charlesen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFelice, Franken
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLewis, Hannahen
dc.creatorKausalik, Emily Anneen
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-9734-4990en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T15:37:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-19T15:37:39Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12en
dc.date.submittedDecember 2015en
dc.date.updated2016-02-19T15:37:39Zen
dc.description.abstractOn November 23, 1963, the British Broadcast Corporation (BBC) premiered a small, low-budget science fiction series titled Doctor Who. The BBC foresaw the program as a tea-time filler on Saturday evenings. Much to their surprise, the show went on to be one of the most popular and influential British television series in the BBC’s history, running with little interruption for nearly thirty years. One of the most striking features of the show is its sound design, something so impressive that many avid viewers recorded the sound of the early episodes during broadcast. Thanks to these viewers’ recordings it is possible to glean a rather complete picture of the aural history of Doctor Who, even in the face of the missing episodes from the 1960s that were wiped or lost by the BBC. This study aims to address the sound design, musical composition, and industrial practices of Doctor Who during its initial run from 1963-1989 on BBC Television, a previously underexplored area of film and television music research. The focus will be on the program’s musical aims in a historical stylistic analysis; how the sound design has been constructed and deployed, why constraints in production standards affect the type of music the program uses, how the highly variable narrative with nearly infinite genre possibilities allows for seemingly infinite approaches to representation through sound, and ultimately the different sounds of the program as well as how the program “sounds.” And at the core of these considerations is the central tenet of the familiar vs. unfamiliar, a focus instilled by producer Verity Lambert that the program relies upon as a unifying concept. In doing so, reinforcement of continuity, expectations of television sound, science fiction sound, British television sound, and perhaps even television sound in Western culture, can be addressed throughout a fifty-year span of television through a single program.en
dc.description.departmentMusicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T28X0Ven
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/33343en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDoctor Whoen
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectTelevision musicen
dc.subjectSound designen
dc.titleTime signatures : music and sound design in Doctor Who (1963–89, 1996, 2005-)en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentMusicen
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen

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