School characteristics associated with the educational resilience of low-income and ethnic minority youth

dc.contributor.advisorStreeter, Calvin L.en
dc.contributor.advisorFranklin, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGreene, Roberta R.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRichardson, Frank C.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSpringer, David W.en
dc.creatorBrooks, Jean Evelynen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-07T19:14:22Zen
dc.date.available2011-02-07T19:14:22Zen
dc.date.available2011-02-07T19:14:32Zen
dc.date.issued2010-12en
dc.date.submittedDecember 2010en
dc.date.updated2011-02-07T19:14:32Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis study empirically tested Benard’s (1991, 2004) theory of resilience and youth development by examining the influence of caring relationships, high expectations and opportunities for participation and contribution within the schools on the mathematics achievement and timely graduation of public high school students. Additional analyses focused on subsamples of students who were at risk of academic failure and school dropout—students from the lowest socioeconomic quartile, African American and Hispanic students, and a generic at-risk sample that includes students from these three groups plus students who had nontraditional families, had a disability, or were retained a grade in school. The study used data from the Educational Longitudinal Study: 2002, which was designed to monitor young people as they transition from tenth grade to postsecondary education and/or employment. Hierarchical Linear Models and Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models were used for the analyses. Experiences within the schools that conveyed caring relationships, high expectations, and opportunities for participation and contribution were associated with higher senior year mathematics achievement scores and increased odds of timely graduation for the overall public school sample and for the at-risk groups. Suggestions are made for increasing caring relationships, high expectations, and opportunities for participation and contribution within the schools. The limitations of this study and directions for further research are also discussed.en
dc.description.departmentSocial Worken
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-12-2176en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectEducational resilienceen
dc.subjectHigh school graduationen
dc.subjectMathematics achievementen
dc.subjectAt-risk youthen
dc.subjectSchool climateen
dc.subjectMinority studentsen
dc.subjectLow-income studentsen
dc.titleSchool characteristics associated with the educational resilience of low-income and ethnic minority youthen
dc.type.genrethesisen
thesis.degree.departmentSocial Work, School ofen
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Worken
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
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