Plutonium for Energy? Explaining the Global Decline of MOX

dc.contributorBonello, Valentina
dc.contributorBurns, Kingsley
dc.contributorMann, W. Neal
dc.contributorAcharya, Hina
dc.contributorKennedy, Kelli
dc.contributorKim, Mu Kwan (Harry)
dc.creatorKuperman, Alan J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T18:57:30Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T18:57:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-22
dc.descriptionThis book emerged from a “Policy Research Project” (PRP) at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin. PRPs are a signature feature of the LBJ School, in which graduate students work with faculty for a year on externally funded research.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlutonium is a controversial fuel for three reasons: it causes cancer, may be used in nuclear weapons, and is very expensive to obtain and process. Yet, relatively little information has been publicly available about the attempted commercialization of plutonium fuel around the world in the last several decades. This book is the first comprehensive global study of “plutonium for energy” – the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in light-water nuclear power reactors that traditionally had used uranium fuel – and is based on field research in all seven countries that have engaged in the commercial production or use of such fuel. The book finds an industry in rapid decline, as five of the countries already have decided to phase out commercial MOX activities, while five of the world’s six commercial production facilities for such MOX fuel have closed prematurely after underperforming. This retreat is attributed to plutonium’s three inherent downsides – safety, security, and cost – which make MOX fuel significantly more expensive, dangerous, and unpopular than traditional uranium fuel. The book includes chapters on Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Its introductory chapter highlights the lessons from these historical cases for countries that are currently contemplating the initiation or expansion of using plutonium fuel – including China, India, Japan, Russia, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States.en_US
dc.description.departmentLBJ School of Public Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJohn D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundationen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2154F77H
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-7329077-0-6
dc.identifier.isbn1-7329077-0-6
dc.identifier.other2018912516
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/69255
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUT Faculty/Researcher Worksen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPolicy Research Project Reports (PRPs)en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectNuclearen_US
dc.subjectEnergyen_US
dc.subjectPlutoniumen_US
dc.subjectMOXen_US
dc.subjectMixed Oxideen_US
dc.subjectFuelen_US
dc.subjectNonproliferationen_US
dc.subjectProliferationen_US
dc.subjectTerrorismen_US
dc.subjectSecurityen_US
dc.subjectSafetyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmenten_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.titlePlutonium for Energy? Explaining the Global Decline of MOXen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
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