Experimental Characterization of Long-Chain Polymer Drilling Fluids

dc.contributor.advisorvan Oort, Eric
dc.creatorJohnson, Mitchell David
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-10T15:35:28Z
dc.date.available2018-05-10T15:35:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.description.abstractSophisticated new drilling technologies such as managed pressure drilling (MPD) and dual gradient drilling (DGD) rely critically on accurate hydraulics modeling. Current fluid measurement and characterization technology performs well under a variety of conditions, but long-chain polymer additives have been shown to introduce significant complexity into the process of predicting frictional pressure losses in drilling operations. Considering the frequent use of long-chain polymer additives as both viscosifiers and friction reducers in drilling, completions and well intervention operations, this work seeks to further investigate the behavior of fluids containing these materials and propose improvements to existing measurement and pressure loss prediction methods. A series of experiments was performed using a fully automated high temperature pipe viscometer to understand the effects of long chain polymer-based additives on fluid behavior in laminar, transitional and turbulent flow. Frictional pressure losses were measured in a cesium formate fluid viscosified with concentrations of xanthan gum up to 2.5 lb/bbl at temperatures ranging from 100 – 230°F. Results were compared with widely used theoretical models for frictional pressure losses, showing significant discrepancy between current theory and empirical results. In light of this discrepancy, a new method for determining frictional pressure losses in turbulent flow was proposed and evaluated. Direct measurement of pressure losses using a flow loop was shown to provide substantially improved pressure prediction in turbulent flow when compared to theoretical correlations commonly used in industry. A field-scale prototype was also developed to apply the pipe viscometer concept, providing the means to conduct future field trials of the technology. The field prototype’s ability to characterize complex drilling fluid behavior in both laminar and turbulent flow shows significant promise for future applications in the drilling fluids domain.en_US
dc.description.departmentPetroleum and Geosystems Engineeringen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2MG7GC8Q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/65136
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHonors Thesesen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.subjectengineering honors thesisen_US
dc.subjectdrilling fluidsen_US
dc.subjectdrilling automationen_US
dc.subjectfluid mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectturbulent flowen_US
dc.subjectrheologyen_US
dc.subjectviscosityen_US
dc.subjectlong-chain polymersen_US
dc.subjectautomationen_US
dc.titleExperimental Characterization of Long-Chain Polymer Drilling Fluidsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

Access full-text files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Mitchell_Johnson_Honors_Thesis.pdf
Size:
880.8 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:

License bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.66 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description:

Collections