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dc.contributor.advisorPope, Gary A.en
dc.contributor.advisorSharma, Mukul M.en
dc.creatorMcCulley, Corey Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T16:50:34Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T16:50:34Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05en
dc.date.submittedMay 2011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3601en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractGas wells suffer a decrease in productivity because of the formation of a liquid hydrocarbon “condensate” in the near wellbore area. This "condensate" forms near producing wells when the flowing pressure is below the reservoir fluid's dew point. Several methods have been shown to temporarily alleviate this problem, but eventually the condensate bank reforms and the productivity again decreases. The use of surfactants to alter the near wellbore wettability to neutral wetting is a potential longer term solution to liquid blocking in these reservoirs. This alteration increases the gas and liquid relative permeabilities and thereby the productivity by reducing the residual liquid saturation. This enhancement allows the accumulated liquid to flow and is durable as long as the wettability alteration is persistent. This solution has been shown to be successful through core flood experiments and field trials in high permeability sandstones, but no improvements had been observed in low permeability cores. As the global demand for energy increases, the petroleum industry has begun to develop unconventional (low permeability) assets, new techniques are needed to maintain and improve their productivity. Liquid blocking in these wells can have a much larger impact on both the gas and condensate production in such low permeability formations. Applying this technique increases both gas and condensate mobility and should increase the economic producing life of these wells. Core flood experiments were conducted to investigate the ability of a chemical treatment to alter the wettability of low permeability sandstones. Previous experimentation did not find any improvement because the increased capillary forces prevented the treatment solution from being easily displaced. This concealed the benefit achieved when the wettability was altered. These experiments recorded smaller relative permeability increases compared to higher permeability core floods, so super critical carbon dioxide was tested as an alternative solvent. While the new treatment was more injectable, it was not as successful at altering wettability. Progress has been made on a solution to liquid blocking in low permeability sandstones, but additional research needs to be completed to further optimize this method.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectSurfactanten
dc.subjectGas productionen
dc.subjectWettabilityen
dc.subjectRelative permeabilityen
dc.subjectSandstoneen
dc.subjectGas condensateen
dc.subjectGas wellsen
dc.titleDevelopment of a chemical treatment for condensate blocking in tight gas sandstoneen
dc.date.updated2011-07-12T16:51:17Zen
dc.identifier.slug2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3601en
dc.description.departmentPetroleum and Geosystems Engineeringen
dc.type.genrethesisen
thesis.degree.departmentPetroleum and Geosystems Engineeringen
thesis.degree.disciplinePetroleum Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Engineeringen


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