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dc.contributor.advisorTharinger, Deborah J.en
dc.creatorMatson, May Fraseren
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-08T14:46:39Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-08T14:46:47Zen
dc.date.available2011-06-08T14:46:39Zen
dc.date.available2011-06-08T14:46:47Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05en
dc.date.submittedMay 2011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3415en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractCollaborative child assessment combines traditional assessment methods with techniques aimed at increasing the therapeutic benefit of assessment for children and parents. Previous studies have found high consumer satisfaction, increased self esteem, decreased symptomatic distress, and greater hopefulness following participation in collaborative assessment. However, full collaborative assessment protocols are complex, time-consuming, and thus not practical to use in many applied settings. This study investigated the practicality and potential benefits of implementing several collaborative techniques into otherwise traditional child assessments, including co-generation of assessment questions, use of a process orientation during child testing, and use of an individualized, level-based approach when providing feedback. It was hypothesized that, compared to parents participating in traditional assessments, parents participating in collaborative assessments would report greater satisfaction, greater collaboration, learning more about their child, stronger alliance with the assessor, more positive feelings about the assessment process, and more hopefulness about their child’s challenges and future. Univariate analysis of variance statistics were used to test these hypotheses, which were not statistically supported, in part due to the limited sample size obtained. However, group differences of small to moderate effect sizes were seen for most of the outcome variables, including parent-reported learning about their child, assessor-parent relationship, assessor-child relationship, collaboration, negative feelings about the assessment, general satisfaction, and negative emotions about their child’s future. The results suggest that further research in this area is warranted. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are discussed.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectCollaborative assessmenten
dc.subjectTherapeutic assessmenten
dc.subjectPsychological assessmentsen
dc.subjectChild psychologyen
dc.titleParent experience of traditional versus collaborative child assessmenten
dc.date.updated2011-06-08T14:46:47Zen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCawthon, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEmmer, Edmunden
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFinn, Stephenen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSherry, Alissaen
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychologyen
dc.type.genrethesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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