Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorShear, Jason B.en
dc.creatorRitschdorff, Eric Thomasen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-20T18:23:11Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-20T18:23:11Zen
dc.date.issued2010-08en
dc.date.submittedAugust 2010en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-08-1938en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractLaser-based techniques have become essential tools for probing biological molecules in systems that demand high spatial and temporal control. This dissertation presents the development of micro-analytical techniques based on multiphoton excitation (MPE) to promote highly localized, three-dimensional (3D) photochemistry of biologically relevant molecules on submicron dimensions. Strategies based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) have been developed for the rapid separation and spectroscopic analysis of short-lived photochemical reaction products. High-speed separation and analysis are achieved through a combination of very high electric fields and a laser-based optical system that uses MPE for both the generation and detection of hydroxyindole photoproducts on the time scale of microseconds. MPE was also used for the development of photolithographic techniques for the creation of microstructured protein-based materials with highly defined three-dimensional (3D) topographies. Specifically, a multiphoton lithographic (MPL) technique was developed that used a low-cost microchip laser for the rapid prototyping of 3D microarchitectures when combined with dynamic optical masking. Furthermore, MPL was used to create novel “smart” biomaterials that reproducibly respond with tunable actuation to changes in the local chemical and thermal environment. The utility of these materials for creating biocompatible cellular microenvironments was demonstrated and presents a novel approach for studying small populations of microorganisms. Finally, through the development of a multifocal approach that used multiple laser beams to promote the photocrosslinking of biological molecules, the speed and versatility of MPL was extended to allow both the parallel fabrication of 3D microstructures and the rapid creation of large-scale biomaterials with highly defined spatial features.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectMultiphoton excitationen
dc.subjectPhotolithographyen
dc.subjectSmart materialsen
dc.subjectCapillary electrophoresisen
dc.titleApplications of multiphoton-excited photochemistry to microsecond capillary electrophoresis, photolithography, and the development of smart materialsen
dc.date.updated2011-10-20T18:23:42Zen
dc.identifier.slug2152/ETD-UT-2010-08-1938en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHolcombe, James A.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStevenson, Keith J.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVanden Bout, David A.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchmidt, Christineen
dc.description.departmentChemistry
dc.type.genrethesisen
thesis.degree.departmentChemistryen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record