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dc.contributor.advisorPadilla, Yolanda C.en
dc.contributor.advisorHolleran, Lori K.en
dc.creatorVillalobos, Griseldaen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-01T15:19:11Zen
dc.date.available2011-02-01T15:19:11Zen
dc.date.created2009-05en
dc.date.issued2011-02-01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/9763en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research study is to explore the role of culture in how Mexican Americans respond to mental health treatment. Cultural background is likely to affect not only the meaning attributed to mental illness, but also help-seeking and responses to treatment. Creating a match between treatment modalities and people's cultural backgrounds requires consideration of a person's cultural context. Cultural characteristics can vary not only across cultural groups, but even within groups can change across time. This study used a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest comparison group design to analyze culturally adapted cognitive behavioral therapy (CACBT) with Mexican Americans diagnosed with depression. A purposive nonprobability sample of 81 adult Mexican Americans diagnosed with depression was recruited from a mental health agency in El Paso, Texas. Forty-eight participants were assigned to a treatment group, which received CACBT, and 33 to a comparison group, which received treatment as usual. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Participant acculturation level was measured using the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II. Independent and paired t tests were used to examine the effectiveness of the culturally adapted intervention. OLS regression analyses examined whether acculturation mediated the relationship between the culturally adapted intervention and depression. No direct effect was found between CACBT and depression relative to treatment as usual. The results showed that CACBT and treatment as usual both decreased depression scores. However, the interaction effect between acculturation and group assignment was significantly related to posttest depression scores. Thus, the effect of CACBT varied according to acculturation level. This study demonstrates the role that acculturation plays in how Mexican Americans respond to mental health treatment. An implication for social work practice is the need to use evidence-based practices that have been tested for their cultural appropriateness with Mexican Americans.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectMexican Americansen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectMental health treatmenten
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectCognitive behavioral therapyen
dc.subjectAcculturationen
dc.titleThe mediating effect of acculturation on the effectiveness of culturally adapted cognitive behavioral therapy with Mexican Americans suffering from depressionen
dc.description.departmentSocial Work, School ofen
thesis.degree.departmentSocial Work, School ofen
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Worken
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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