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dc.creatorMarteleto, Letícia J.
dc.creatorGuedes, Gilvan
dc.creatorCoutinho, Raquel Z.
dc.creatorWeitzman, Abigail
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T16:46:42Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T16:46:42Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/81887
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/8895
dc.descriptionThe Zika virus was first reported in Brazil in 2014. In late 2015, Brazil’s Ministry of Health announced the association between the Zika virus and microcephaly, which was followed by intense national and international media coverage. Government officials subsequently released statements recommending that women postpone pregnancies. The authors use monthly data on live births and other data sources to show that the number of live births fell in 2016 approximately 9 months after the publicized link between the Zika virus and microcephaly. Declines were observed across all educational groups and all but the oldest age groups and in both the northeastern and southern states examined in more detail.
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Texas at Austin Population Research Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofPRC Research & Policy Brief Seriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPRC Research & Policy Brief; 5(3)
dc.subjectZika virusen_US
dc.subjectmicrocephalyen_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectlive birthsen_US
dc.titleLive Births Fell in Brazil after the Link between the Zika Virus and Microcephaly Was Widely Publicizeden_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.description.departmentPopulation Research Centeren_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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