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dc.contributor.advisorPriebe, Nicholas
dc.creatorPattadkal, Jagruti Jagadish
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T23:46:17Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T23:46:17Z
dc.date.created2019-08
dc.date.issued2019-08-13
dc.date.submittedAugust 2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/78625
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5681
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I have explored the mechanisms underlying the selectivity of different visual features in the mouse. I have compared these mechanisms to the canonical mechanisms for extracting these features. In chapter 2, I have demonstrated existence of nonclassical receptive fields in which the orientation preference can depend on the spatial frequency, in the mouse visual cortex. I have compared the experimental data with a model based on random connectivity between cells which predicts existence of such receptive fields. In chapter 3, I have studied the input differences between V1 neurons with varying degrees of linearity in spatial summation. I have demonstrated evidence of connectivity which deviates from the standard hierarchical connectivity model. I show that nonlinear cells in the mouse V1 can receive thalamic input which can itself be nonlinear and also orientation selective. In chapter 4, I have studied the development of binocular disparity tuning and using monocular deprivation. I show that disparity selectivity in the mouse is reduced following contralateral eye deprivation during critical period. This effect is due to a disruption of existing disparity selectivity in the circuit following deprivation, as we observe no difference in degree of selectivity between adult animals and young mice before critical period. This disruption may be due to formation of new inputs which disrupt the matching between left and right eye existing inputs. We provide evidence for this by demonstrating a reduction in spatial acuity for the open eye inputs following deprivation. Across all of these studies, I demonstrate multiple instances in which the mouse pathways differ from the classical early visual pathways. But I also find evidence for a distinctive connectivity, similar to the classical models. My thesis highlights the diversity in circuit computations which leads to the processing outcomes that are shared across the mammalian species
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectMouse
dc.subjectVision
dc.subjectNeurons
dc.subjectMouse visual system
dc.subjectMouse visual features
dc.subjectMouse visual cortex
dc.titleComputations in the early visual system in the mouse
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-12-02T23:46:17Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberAldrich, Richard W
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFiete, Ila
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHuk, Alexander C
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMovshon, J Anthony
dc.description.departmentNeuroscience
thesis.degree.departmentNeuroscience
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-7420-459X
dc.type.materialtext


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