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dc.contributor.advisorBlack, Sandra E.
dc.contributor.advisorSpears, Dean E.
dc.creatorLoPalo, Melissa Christine
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T16:20:01Z
dc.date.available2019-08-12T16:20:01Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-06-20
dc.date.submittedMay 2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/75530
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/2635
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines determinants of worker productivity, labor market outcomes, and population health. The first chapter, previously published in the Journal of Public Economics, examines the impacts of cash assistance on refugee labor market outcomes. I exploit variation across states and over time in the generosity of cash assistance available to refugees upon arrival in the U.S. and study the impacts on wages and employment. I argue that cash assistance is randomly assigned to refugees conditional on characteristics such as education and country of origin, as refugee placement is decided by a committee that does not meet with the refugees or learn their preferences. I find that refugees resettled with more generous cash assistance go on to earn higher wages, with no significant change in the probability of employment. The effects are largest for highly-educated refugees. The second chapter examines the impact of temperature on the productivity and job performance of outdoor workers in developing countries. I overcome data challenges with studying individual-level productivity by studying household survey interviewers as workers. Using data from Demographic and Health Survey interviewers in 46 countries, I find that interviewers complete fewer interviews per hour worked on hot and humid days, driven by an increase in working hours. I also find evidence that suggests that workers allocate their effort towards tasks that are more easily observed by supervisors on hot days. The third chapter, previously published in Social Justice Research and co-authored with Diane Coffey and Dean Spears, examines the role of social inequality in population health outcomes in India, focusing on the case of casteism and child height in India. We describe evidence from the India Human Development Survey showing that children in villages with more strongly casteist attitudes are shorter on average, an association that is statistically explained by the association between casteism and the prevalence of open defecation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectLabor economics
dc.subjectRefugees
dc.subjectWorker productivity
dc.titleEssays on the determinants of worker productivity and labor market outcomes
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-08-12T16:20:02Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGeruso, Michael L
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCoffey, Diane L
dc.description.departmentEconomics
thesis.degree.departmentEconomics
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.type.materialtext


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