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dc.creatorMichelle, Miley
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-01T20:10:44Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01T20:10:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2542JV9X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/72714
dc.description.abstractThis essay argues that institutional ethnography, a methodology LaFrance and Nicolas (2012) describe and advocate for in writing studies, provides a means by which writing center scholars can add to their maps of how their writing center programs coordinate with other writing programs at their institutions. From these maps, we can better articulate what writing center work is and what it is not, advocating for an institutional culture of interdependence. The essay extends the findings from a local institutional ethnography to add insights from multiple institutions. The findings suggest that writing center administrators may advocate for our work not only by arguing for parity with other writing programs, but also by communicating with others within the institution to align our internal narratives with external images. In addition, the findings imply that methodologies such as institutional ethnography are critical for examining the radical relationality central to writing center work.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPraxis: A Writing Center Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPraxis: A Writing Center Journal;Vol 16, No 1
dc.subjectWriting programsen_US
dc.subjectinterdependenceen_US
dc.titleMapping Boundedness and Articulating Interdependence Between Writing Centers and Writing Programsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentUniversity Writing Centeren_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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