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dc.contributorCicchini, Emily
dc.contributorKishi, Coco
dc.contributorGong, Ming
dc.contributorOlmanson, Justin
dc.contributorRobertson, Suloni
dc.contributorMedina, Sarah
dc.contributorRaghavan, Nithya Saundara
dc.contributorGreen, Sarah
dc.creatorShankar, Jishnu
dc.creatorRanjan, Rakesh
dc.creatorNik Ilieva, Gabriela
dc.creatorJoshi, Himanshu
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-25T18:42:41Z
dc.date.available2018-07-25T18:42:41Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-10
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2KD1R37P
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/65803
dc.descriptionSouth Asia in general, and India specifically, are regions with immense diversity in culture and language. Because of this conversations about medicine between doctors and patients takes different forms from one region to another. This is especially true when we look at urban, suburban and rural doctor-patient interactions. Added to these is the element of gender. Owing to the somewhat conservative worldview of gender interactions, even doctor-patients conversations might become colored by it. The clips in this section show variations of patterns of conversation in the practice of conventional medicine.en_US
dc.language.isohinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConventional Patterns of Conversationen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectMedicine, Ayurvedicen_US
dc.subjectTraditional medicineen_US
dc.subjectMedicine, Unanien_US
dc.subjectHindien_US
dc.subjectHindi language--Technical Hindien_US
dc.subjectHindi language--Study and teachingen_US
dc.subjectUrduen_US
dc.subjectUrdu language--Technical Urduen_US
dc.subjectUrdu language--Study and teachingen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.subjectPublic health--Indiaen_US
dc.titleCombining Medical Traditionsen_US
dc.typeLearning objecten_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.typeWebsiteen_US
dc.description.departmentAsian Studiesen_US
dc.description.departmentHindi Urdu Flagship
dc.description.departmentSouth Asia Institute
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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  • Conventional Patterns of Conversation
    South Asia in general, and India specifically, are regions with immense diversity in culture and language. Because of this conversations about medicine between doctors and patients takes different forms from one region to another. This is especially true when we look at urban, suburban and rural doctor-patient interactions. Added to these is the element of gender. Owing to the somewhat conservative worldview of gender interactions, even doctor-patients conversations might become colored by it. The clips in this section show variations of patterns of conversation in the practice of conventional medicine.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States