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dc.contributor.advisorRoberts-Miller, Patricia, 1959-
dc.creatorHatch, Justin Dean
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-25T14:56:21Z
dc.date.available2018-07-25T14:56:21Z
dc.date.created2016-05
dc.date.issued2016-09-29
dc.date.submittedMay 2016
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2930PC5H
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/65780
dc.description.abstractScholars have turned toward Deliberative Democracy in recent decades in part because of its potential for including more voices in decision making processes that affect an increasingly diverse polity. Inherent in Deliberative Democracy’s models, though, are what can be understood as prescriptions of certain types of civility, as consensus is posited as only happening under particular circumstances. Valuing radical inclusion, this study investigates historical negative effects of civility policing before exploring a more agonistic approach’s potential for the inclusion of all voices, especially those previously marginalized.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectCivility
dc.subjectInclusion
dc.subjectActivism
dc.subjectRadical
dc.subjectAgonism
dc.subjectDeliberative Democracy
dc.subjectPublic sphere
dc.subjectRadical inclusion
dc.subjectCivility policing
dc.subjectMarginalized voices
dc.titleInclusivity and the (un)civil paradox : critiquing and needing civility in the public sphere
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-07-25T14:56:21Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLongaker, Mark
dc.description.departmentEnglish
thesis.degree.departmentEnglish
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-3353-4135
dc.type.materialtext


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