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dc.creatorRoberts, Floyd
dc.creatorLomshek, David
dc.creatorBrower, William E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-19T18:20:58Z
dc.date.available2018-04-19T18:20:58Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2MK65R8K
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/64404
dc.description.abstractThe ability to perform in-flight rapid prototyping would be of great benefit to NASA in two ways. First, repair parts could be fabricated from CAD designs beamed up from earth based laboratories which might allow a failed experiment to proceed. The mission specialists themselves, under the creative influence of space flight, might design a new part or tool and fabricate it on board in a matter of hours. Second, with metal casting and ceramic sintering facilities on board, rapid prototyping would allow manufacturing in space. This paper presents some test criteria for evaluating two of the rapid prototyping techniques, stereolithography and fused deposition, in microgravity conditions. Effects of the variation of head speed and strip width for the fused deposition process on the resulting mechanical properties are presented. The mechanical strength of the polyamide test bars increased with both increasing head speed and strip width. Increasing head speed would be desirable in microgravity applications.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartof1992 International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposiumen_US
dc.subjectCAD designsen_US
dc.subjectrapid prototypingen_US
dc.subjectin-flight rapid prototypingen_US
dc.titleRapid Prototyping at Zero Gravity for In-Flight Repairs and Fabrication on Space Station Freedomen_US
dc.typeConference paperen_US
dc.description.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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