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dc.creatorBorrero, Sonya
dc.creatorZite, Nikki
dc.creatorPotter, Joseph E.
dc.creatorTrussell, James
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-03T18:31:43Z
dc.date.available2018-04-03T18:31:43Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T24T6FM09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/64162
dc.description.abstractFemale sterilization, typically accomplished by means of tubal ligation, is a widely used method of contraception that is highly effective at preventing unintended pregnancy. Yet there appears to be unmet demand for the procedure in certain segments of the U.S. population. Specifically, low-income women and women from minority racial and ethnic groups may face substantial system-level barriers to obtaining a desired sterilization procedure. One such barrier is the federal policy regarding Medicaid-funded sterilizations. Although this policy was designed to protect vulnerable populations, we believe that it does not effectively fulfill that intention — in fact, it restricts the reproductive autonomy of the women it intends to serve. With the upcoming Medicaid expansions, the number of women affected by these barriers could increase substantially.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTxPEPen_US
dc.subjectNew England Journal of Medicineen_US
dc.subjectmedicaid policyen_US
dc.subjectbarriersen_US
dc.subjectcontraceptionen_US
dc.subjectwomenen_US
dc.titleMedicaid Policy on Sterilization — Anachronistic or Still Relevant?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentPopulation Research Centeren_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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