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dc.creatorFreedman, Lawrence
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-22T19:09:57Z
dc.date.available2018-03-22T19:09:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T20863P09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/63940
dc.descriptionIn this article, I show how little the general meaning of the term changed during the 19th century. Throughout Europe, discussion about strategy and tactics continued to be shaped by the sharp focus on battle and what this required of commanders. Whereas the early discussions concerning strategy in the late 18th century opened up new possibilities for thinking about the changing art of war, later discussion shut it down and thus constrained thinking. Despite the strong nationalist sentiments that shaped thinking about war, the participants in this debate were normally senior military figures who were still serving or were recently retired and were primarily concerned with officer education. They read each other’s books, if necessary in translation, and studied the same great battles of history from which they drew similar lessons.7en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas National Security Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas National Security Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas National Security Review;Vol 1, No 2
dc.subjectFreedman Lawrenceen_US
dc.subjectstrategyen_US
dc.subjecttacticsen_US
dc.subjectEuropeen_US
dc.subjectTNSR Vol. 1, Iss. 2en_US
dc.titleThe Meaning of Strategy: Part II: The Objectives (February 2018)en_US
dc.typeJournalen_US
dc.description.departmentLBJ School of Public Affairsen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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