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dc.contributor.advisorRaab-Graham, Kimberly F.
dc.creatorWorkman, Emily Rush
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T19:12:46Z
dc.date.available2018-03-20T19:12:46Z
dc.date.created2015-12
dc.date.issued2016-01-13
dc.date.submittedDecember 2015
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T20K26T98
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/63884
dc.description.abstractN-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists have gained much attention of late for their ability to remediate major depressive disorder. The body of evidence surrounding their mechanism of action suggests that they activate cellular homeostatic mechanisms. This thesis examines the convergence of rapid antidepressant and homeostatic mechanisms. It provides evidence of the homeostatic interaction between NMDAR and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor B (GABABR), a metabotropic inhibitory receptor, by demonstrating that GABABR function shifts from opening inwardly rectifying potassium channels to increasing resting dendritic calcium signal upon application of NMDAR antagonists. This fundamental shift in function plays an important role in the activation of protein synthesis dependent homeostatic mechanisms that occur in response to NMDAR antagonists. We hypothesize that the GABABR shift in function is a unifying pathway between rapid antidepressant and local homeostatic mechanisms.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectGABAB receptor
dc.subjectNMDA receptor
dc.subjectHomeostasis
dc.subjectHippocampus
dc.subjectRapid antidepressants
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectCultured neurons
dc.titleHomeostatic interaction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor B (GABABR)
dc.title.alternativeHomeostatic interaction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor B (GABABR)
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-03-20T19:12:46Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHarris, Kristen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJohnston, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSullivan, Christopher
dc.contributor.committeeMemberZemelman, Boris
dc.description.departmentNeuroscience
thesis.degree.departmentNeuroscience
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.type.materialtext


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