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dc.contributor.advisorHeath, Robert W., Jr, 1973-
dc.creatorWang, Yuyang, active 21st century
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-05T14:59:52Z
dc.date.available2017-12-05T14:59:52Z
dc.date.created2017-05
dc.date.issued2017-05-05
dc.date.submittedMay 2017
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2GQ6RJ5M
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/62910
dc.description.abstractVehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication may provide high data rates to vehicles via millimeter-wave (mmWave) microcellular networks. This thesis uses stochastic geometry to analyze the coverage of urban mmWave microcellular networks. Prior work used a pathloss model with a line-of- sight probability function based on randomly oriented buildings, to determine whether a link was line-of-sight or non-line-of-sight. In this thesis, we use a pathloss model inspired by measurements, which uses a Manhattan distance model and accounts for differences in pathloss exponents and losses when turn- ing corners. In our model, streets and base stations (BSs) are randomly located on a network formed by a two dimensional Poisson line process. Our model is well suited for urban microcellular networks where the base stations are deployed at street level. Based on this new approach, we derive the coverage probability under certain BS association rules to obtain closed-form solutions without much complexity. In addition, we draw two main conclusions from our work. First, non-line-of-sight BSs are not a major benefit for association or source of interference. Second, there is an ultra-dense regime where deploying (active) BSs does not enhance coverage.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectMmWave
dc.subjectVehicle-to-infrastructure
dc.subjectPathloss model
dc.titleMmWave vehicle-to-infrastructure communication : analysis of urban microcellular networks
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-12-05T14:59:52Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVeciana, Gustavo de
dc.description.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Engineering
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-4268-1396
dc.type.materialtext


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