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dc.creatorDegner, Hillary
dc.creatorWojciehowski, Kylie
dc.creatorGiroux, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-16T17:10:59Z
dc.date.available2017-11-16T17:10:59Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T28P5VS1G
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/62619
dc.descriptionBecause writing centers exist to help students find success in academia—to enter doors that may otherwise be closed to them—writing center literature rightly discusses the need to work with students of all backgrounds and abilities (Pemberton; Neff; Hamel). Writing center personnel have written about how writing centers and other campus resources can support students with disabilities (Hewett; Logan; Zimmerman), as well as the diverse ways in which these students learn and what we, in turn, can learn from them. The field actively recognizes that writing centers and student support centers in general are actually engaging in political advocacy, a fact that has been noted in this very publication.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPraxis: A Writing Center Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPraxis: A Writing Center Journal;Vol 13, No 1
dc.subjectDegneren_US
dc.subjectWojciehowskien_US
dc.subjectGirouxen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectillnessesen_US
dc.titleOpening Closed Doors: A Rationale for Creating a Safe Space for Tutors Struggling with Mental Health Concerns or Illnessesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentUniversity Writing Centeren_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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