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dc.creatorGray, Jennifer P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-20T15:48:45Z
dc.date.available2017-10-20T15:48:45Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2C24R412
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/62194
dc.descriptionNon-traditional students make up a large portion of the current college student population. Mike Rose indicates that the “non-traditional student is becoming the new norm” for higher education, and according to the National Center for Education Statistics, nontraditional students make up “almost 40%” of all students enrolled in higher education (8). This number is slippery, however, as there are different definitions of non-traditional students. The National Center for Education Statistics defines non-traditional students as students who have had at least a five-year break in their education (National). Sometimes financial independence or high school-related experiences are the guides for this label, which includes those who have a GED, were homeschooled, or have an international schooling background (Hess, National). At my institution, non-traditional students are classified as students over the age of 25, and they make up 37% of our student population.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPraxis: A Writing Center Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPraxis: A Writing Center Journal;Vol 11, No 1
dc.subjectJennifer P. Grayen_US
dc.subjectnormalcyen_US
dc.subjectGrayen_US
dc.subjecttranslatingen_US
dc.subjectnon-traditionalen_US
dc.titleTranslating Normalcy: Tutors Navigating Spaces Between Expectations and Experiences for Non-Traditional Studentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentUniversity Writing Centeren_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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